Blizzard of 1898

The Blizzard of 1898

 
One of the earliest documented snow storms in Hamilton took place in February 1845 when it snowed continuously for three days. The overland four horse stage coach to Toronto took two days to complete the trip from Hamilton. Possibly the worst snow storm ever to hit the Hamilton area, however, took place just over 100 years ago. On December 4, 1898 the snow began to fall. It continued to fall all night leaving a heavy coating of snow on everything. Then, on Sunday at noon, the temperature plummeted and strong winds picked up. Telephone and hydro poles began snapping off and live wires crackled across James Street North for over an hour before the power could be turned off. Large tree branches fell, in some cases just barely missing pedestrians. There were no outside telephone or telegraph connections and the city was without electricity for nearly thirty-six hours. No trains could get in or out of the city and the streetcars were at a complete standstill.
 
Following are some views of Hamilton after the great storm of '98! 
 
A view of James Street South at Gore Park
A view of James Street South at Gore Park
 
St. Thomas' Church, Main Street East
St. Thomas' Church, Main Street East
 
Hunter Street West showing the east end of the Hunter Street Tunnel of the Toronto, Hamilton & Buffalo Railway
Hunter Street West showing the east end of the Hunter Street Tunnel of the Toronto, Hamilton & Buffalo Railway
 
Looking west on King Street East from Wellington Street
Looking west on King Street East from Wellington Street
 

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